Accounting for Health Insurance Premiums

At this point in the year, many of you are now familiar with the Small Business Health Care Tax Credit.  If you qualified for the credit for 2010, you likely witnessed first hand all the extra information that is required for the credit calculation.  Below is an except from our recent newsletter on the tax credit.

Health Insurance Premium Bookkeeping
Much of the tax credit calculation revolves around eligible employee hours and wages; however, once an employer is determined to be eligible for the credit, much more information is needed with regards to the employer’s health insurance premiums.  Fortunately, a few simple procedural bookkeeping changes can greatly simplify this portion of the calculation:

  • Classification of owner and family member insurance – when posting health and dental insurance premium payments, make sure premiums for owners and their family members are posted to a separate sub-account of employee benefits.  These premiums are not included in the calculation, so it is important that they be separated.
  • Premiums for seasonal workers – even though it is important to classify seasonal worker wages and hours separately from eligible employees, their premiums are actually included in the calculation, so make sure their premiums are included with those for eligible employees.
  • Record coverage information in books – in order to finish the calculation, you have to report the type of coverage (single or family) and the number of employees with each coverage type.  To simplify this final step, be sure to note this information in the “memo” field in your books when recording the premium payment.  Typically, this information is provided on the bill from the insurance company, and it is much easier to record this each month than pull all the bills at year end.

For general information on the Small Business Health Care Tax Credit, refer to our post from last year.

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About Brian Germer, CPA

CPA with Parsons and Germer CPAs, LLP in Portland, OR

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